Do you have a point of view regarding our changing our style guide….

I am inclined to say “website”. I was at Dow Jones when the Journal decided to adopt “email” instead of “e-mail”. Many of us in marketing groaned that it was the wrong decision.


I checked the Journal. WSJ.com articles are almost exclusively “Web site”. Note the use of the initial cap, which is present in all samples I reviewed. Walt Mossberg follows the company line. In fact, all reference to web in the Journal are capitalized. “Web page” “Web site” “Web service” etc.

see http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=website

Usage Note:  The transition from World Wide Web site to Web site to website as a single uncapitalized word mirrors the development of other technological expressions which have tended to take unhyphenated forms as they become more familiar. Thus email is gaining ground over the forms E-mail and e-mail, especially in texts that are more technologically oriented. Similarly, there is an increasing preference for closed forms like homepage, online, and printout. Is it every part of the proper name, for example “visit the AMA Website”? Would you write “I need to make a Telephone call?” I don’t think so and therefore I think the Journal has it wrong. Unlike “FTP site”, web is not a TLA (three-letter acronym), and it is not a brand. Tim Berners-Lee intentionally chose not to commercialize or patent or trademark.There used to be many sites in use : gopher, FTP, web, etc. Since the culture has really glommed onto web sites, the others are less significant and so compounding the noun into “website” seems fine.

Businessweek says “website”. (I have always found BusinessWeek more progressive on technology topics.)

Google says 2.3 billion pages use “website” while 825 million use “web site”.

New York Times is the same as WSJ.

The New Yorker uses “Web site” like NYT and WSJ.

Fortune is the same as Businessweek.

Nature uses “website”

So there you have it … my overly exhaustive vote for “website”. And, secondarily, web as lowercase when used as a modifier.
I make a distinction between internet and Internet. I use “internet” as an adjective to describe networks and technologies which use TCP/IP networking and related technologies. I use “Internet” capitalized to refer to the specific TCP/IP network which connects residential, business, and personal networks together.