While we all say we want our children to be happy in their lives, there is very little time spent in schools or modern child rearing which is focused on that outcome. There is no evidence that an admission letter to an Ivy League school is going to lead to a greater sense of satisfaction in life but we seem to pursue it as the highest level of recognition for the 18-years of effort that we call parenting.

Management Guru Marshall Goldsmith and daughter/collaborator Kelly Goldsmith have conducted a study to identify the sources of satisfaction in life.  While we all say we want our children to be happy in their lives, there is very little time spent in schools or modern child rearing which is focused on that outcome. There is no evidence that an admission letter to an Ivy League school is going to lead to a greater sense of satisfaction in life but we seem to pursue it as the highest level of recognition for the 18-years of effort that we call parenting.


Here are a few quick conclusions from their research:
  1. Watch Less TV.
  2. Web Surf less for non-professional reasons
  3. Do fewer chores
  4. Spend time with people you love
  5. Challenge Youself
In different but related news, Dutch researchers have found that travelers returning from vacation are no happier than those who stayed at work.  But the anticipation of vacation made them happier in the days and weeks before the big trip.

The Dutch are known for being happy people.  Hmm.  Maybe we should book vacations and cancel them at the last minute.  We'll enjoy the happy runup to the event and then save boatloads of cash.